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Random pictures
Thursday, Jun 28, 2012
Mt Siple volcano in Antarctica might have become active and produced a steam plume recently detected on satellite imagery. The latest Smithsonian activity report mentions: ... [more]

Siple volcano

shield volcano 3110 m / 10,203 ft
Marie Byrd Land, Western Antarctica, -73.43°S / -126.67°W
Current status: restless (2 out of 5)
Siple webcams / live data
Siple volcano books
Last update: 28 Jun 2012 (possible steaming detected on 20 June)
Typical eruption style: effusive
Siple volcano eruptions: 2012 (?) No recent earthquakes
TimeMag. / DepthDistanceLocation
Mount Siple volcano is one of the largest active volcanoes in Antarctica. It is a young shield volcano in the NW of Siple Island, Hobbs Coast, Antarctica. Mount Siple forms an island off the Pacific coast of Antarctica's Marie Byrd Land and is separated from the coast by the Getz Ice Shelf.
Mount Siple was first visited on 22 February 1984 by crew of the cruise II of USCGC Polar Sea.

Background:

from Smithsonian / GVP volcano information:
The massive 1800 cu km volcano is truncated by a 4-5 km summit caldera and is ringed by tuff cones at sea level. Its lack of dissection in a coastal area more susceptible to erosion than inland Antarctic volcanoes, and the existence of a satellite cone too young to date by the Potassium-Argon method, suggest a possible Holocene age (LeMasurier and Thomson 1990). The location of Mount Siple on published maps is 26 km NE of the actual location.
A possible eruption cloud observed on satellite images on September 18 and October 4, 1988 was considered to result from atmospheric effects after low-level aerial observations revealed no evidence of recent eruptions (Smithsonian Scientific Event Alert Network Bulletin).


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